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but geographically over to egypt, because as you know, we went there. now we have a unique situation in israel that, as we've said, creates all kinds of fascinating but somewhat negative issues regarding ethics. egypt was a different story, because here, we have a predominantly muslim country. now you know, i'm sure you're well aware of that. in egypt- i mean, in israel, the political power is held by the jews; as we heard, the christians are a minority, even christian arabs, and they don't know what they're doing even with a partition. but in egypt, obviously, we have a muslim majority. now what happens here is we had a fascinating interview with reverend noor. we've already seen coptic christians that have for centuries well beyond the muslims, before the muslims enjoyed something of a, you know, left alone for the most part, allowed to exist. but we have protestant christians actually in egypt, and we had a chance to chat with reverend noor who heads up an evangelical protestant church there- a world renowned figure on the level of billy graham in that part of the country, and to hear his strugg
, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions coming one day after egypt help broker a cease-fire in the gaza strip. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joined us earlier to weigh in saying it's no coincidence. >> he didn't wait but one day before moving here. so whether he had a wink and a nod from president obama or whether whether he felt emboldened in the wake of the cease-fire to believe the u.s. would not criticize him or do anything major to stop this power grab, i think we'll have to find out in the next few days. the timing is not coincidental. you can bet on that. >> heather: coming up the latest reaction from the white house to the turmoil
by population? it turns out it's not at all a close call. it's egypt, by a lot. more than one in five people in the middle east is egyptian. it's not the richest country, it's not geographically in the middle, but it is the center of gravity for both population and the politics of that whole blessed region. geographically, more toward the middle of the whole middle east is the nation of israel, comparatively tiny. if you want to understand where the fighting is centered, you have to zoom in even further to a whole different scale to even be able to see what the relevant border is over which this fighting is happening. looking at it in that context, you might ask, what's that giant border right next to this relativity tiny place being fought over? that's egypt. that's the egyptian border right up next to this tiny strip of land where the fighting is happening in gaza. that's why part of why this was such a big deal. egypt and israel shaking hands. thank you jimmy carter. the peace treaty between this important country, the nation of israel. but jimmy carter, it turns out, is not only the only
, straight ahead, crisis in egypt. the key players met this afternoon. are the president and top judges any closer to a deal to calm clashes in cairo? and why does what happened there matter here? that's next. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of
of the tensions between religion, and the spot we picked on, dare i say, was israel and then to some extent egypt. and we wanted to go to israel in particular because there isn't such a diverse cultural environment in terms of religion, so that the tensions are, in some senses, watered down. as we all know, unless you've been meditating in a cave for the past 20 years, israel and the social environment in israel is very tense in terms of the relationship between the three great faiths that actually share something of a cultural tradition- judaism, christianity, and islam. and so what we- we have an extraordinary opportunity, and something like a great risk. i'm surprised david ainsworth, our executive producer, hasn't come out and read this e-mail message i sent to him about three days before we're ready to go on this journey. we planned it of course for several months. we're talking about a crew of at least six people- a lot of preparation, and of course, at the time when we were set to go was one of the worst possible times in terms of the tension; you know, again, another flare-up between the
that is now unfolding in egypt, where just hours ago, the country's highest judicial body calling for a national strike. the protest of a prove by the president there, mohammed morsi granting himself sweeping new powers, a move that since resulted in the violent and widespread protests they've seen. and steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo with the latest. where do the protests go from here? >> rick, the numbers are down today from what we saw on friday and we're likely to see more large scale protest demonstrations in the coming days, after sunday morning prayers and again on tuesday. what we're likely to see then are really competing margins, those who support the president, who feel like his moves are necessary, to break the log jam and to move the country forward and those who think that the president is trying to achieve a dictatorship. those who are trying to block him. so we're going to see more large scale protests and the other things to watch resignation is, three presidential aides have recently resigned in the past two hours and the judges are refusing, so if it
in terms of egypt, a place to live and, the authoritarian regina was especially effective for some time. this issue of outside support -- outside instability was a mechanism to sustain its role. there were many parts of society that are still susceptible to that kind of appeal, particularly in conditions of growing insecurity. i you addressed this as a matter of public education -- how you address this is a matter of public education. to diffuse the different view of these issues for public schools, and if there is the political will to do that, that is a different question. i thought you're getting to the different issue of human rights education in the security apparatus themselves, giving them a different perspective on their role. we have a double challenge here, and that raises the issue that we talked about, in terms of political will. you may want to elaborate on this point in terms of egypt. >> i would just add and say, the way you characterized the securitization of a lot of aspects of egyptian social like -- i will thank you for mentioning that. it is part institutional. it wa
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
with secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister standing side by side. secretary clinton calling the agreement a step in the right direction. >> united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. the rocket attacks must end. a broader, calmer return. the people of the region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence and today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. >> today's announcement follows secretary clinton's diplomatic barnstorm through the middle east and made stops in egypt, west bank and egypt. and it follows more than a week of cross border rocket fire exchanges between israel and hamas in gaza. now, that has left 100 people dead. joining me now from gaza is nbc news foreign correspondent amman mulhadeen. i saw you turn around and notice the night skylight up behind you. that was a minute within the cease-fire taking effect. do we know that's rocket fire coming in behind you? >> reporter: it was, in fact. it was an israeli air strike north of where we are. gaza is still very much a war zone atmospher
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
christian families in egypt. we'll tell you who is helping them survive and giving them hope for the future. christians in america are giving thanks to god for their spiritual heritage. hello, everyone. i'm wendy griffith. george thomas is on assignment. believers are celebrating the fact that america was founded as a christian nation. not too long ago, archeologists at jamestown, virginia, discovered the original church, built in 1608 as james fort. it's the place where pok pok pokehontus married. and it is the place of america's history. >> if you kill him, you'll have to kill me, too. >> stand back. >> i won't. >> pok pokehontus is legendary. smith claimed the daughter of chief palatan came to his rescue, after he had been taken prisoner by her father's men. this native american heroin would later marry another jamestown columnist, john roth. just where that marriage took place has been a mystery, that is until now. nearly 400 years after that historic wedding. where we're standing right now, this is where pokehontus and john roth would have gotten married? >> absolutely. >> reporter: he
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
to create a moral equivalency. i think a ground war is obviously going to test where is egypt, where is turkey. we know where iran is. they are arming the hamas, missiles or a lot of them seem to come out of iran. in essence, it seems to me that something pro joked by iran and encouraged by egypt and turkey by immediately taking the side of hamas which is extraordinary. >> greta: so, with hamas in order to get them to step down from its firing rockets into israel and doing provocative, take at hamas. why in the world they are going reach with truce. they are consumed with hatred toward israel. they were very tight and close to iran. today they identified six people who they felt were conspiring with the israelis. they executed them and dragged one body through the streets. they used civilians as shields. where in the world is if i do strike a temporary deal, why in the world would you ever think it would stick or hold? >> you would have to be totally unrealistic. the secretary-general's comments everybody should show restraint is absurd. if somebody lobbed 130 bombs on new york we wo
crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked o
in egypt and tunisia to push this forward and to overcome the increasing polarization. >> i will add to and dan's remarks and say in terms of technicalities and specific steps that need to be taken to reconfigure the domestic security establishment, they are all laid out there in a study that was put together by a group of civil society leaders as well as a group of meetings from the securities sector, commonly known as police for egypt. there's a great deal of debate within civil society about the exact concrete actionable step that needs to be taken in the short run and in the long run some of these steps when themselves to the type of changes that would require the liberation. this is one issue to keep in mind. the dialog's ideas are out there but what is missing as dan mentioned is the political will, the seriousness to engage in dialogue on this issue, even if they're not ready to adopt policy recommendations, there needs to be some kind of ongoing dialogue on these issues but at the same time i want to point out the issue of political will is important, there will always be a c
in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. howe
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
of egypt's muslim brotherhood. the party of egyptian president mohammed morsi as he agrees to new talks about over his controversial decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. steve harrigan is streaming live from care row. what can you tell us. >> details of the offices of the muslim brotherhood. attack happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waitin
and it's the ultimate nn trying to declare the judiciary in egypt basically null and void. >> yeah, look, morsi came out last week looking rather good, like a statesman and he helped organization the cease-fire and reined hamas in and took responsibility and moved immediately from that to give himself dictatorial powers. if those dictatorial powers are taken by him the arab spring is pretty much over and democratization is pretty much over. i'men couraged to see how many people come into the streets and they don't want to trade mubarak to the theocracy that morsi and the brotherhood are proposing. i'm not sure at that morsi is going to give up that easily. >> alisyn: thank you for your insight. good to see you. up next it's a state in debt. why is illinois spending for cable for prisoners and on pig races. and a man gets through security with a woman's boarding pass? how was that done and is anything being done about it. ♪ ♪ ♪ hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the be
overnight after morsi refused to reverse his decrees. he met with egypt's top judges and told them the powers are meant to be temporary. they had a mass froes but canceled them to avoid any clashes. two men are arrested for their roles in the fast and furious operation. he was sentenced to 3 and a half years behind bars and shawn stewart sentenced to nine years. both men illegally purchased weapons and smuggled them into mexico in order to give to members of drug cartels there. fast and furious was -- two were found at the shooting of border patrol agent brian perry. >>> an ohio mother is under rays after her 3-year-old son's body was found in a treatment plant. his mother called 911 claiming he disappeared from a park. >> i am at a park and my son is missing. i was looking every where. >> police say the story started changing as she failed a polygraph test. one of the other children was pointing to a garbage truck around where he disappeared. they decide to do check the landfill. his body was found in a trash bag. she is being held on murder charges. >>> here's a lesson of what no
hillary clinton is in cairo this morning working to make that peace happen. can egypt help bring an end to the fighting? and back at home, all eyes on the white house for a thanksgiving tradition. the presidential turkey pardon. get ready to gobble up the history of this bird watch. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, november 21st, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert filling in for the great chuck todd. a commuter bus exploded in central tel aviv injuring at least 19 people steps away from the national defense he headquarters. israeli police confirm that an explosive device detonated but say it was not a suicide attack. the white house is calling the attack against israeli civilians outrage o outrageous. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo
as egypt's president expands his power on the heels of helping to broker a ceasefire between israel and hamas. >>> new egyptian leader, same old story for the u.s. relationship? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 26, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. welcome back from the long break. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. congressional leaders return to washington this week and with just 36 days left to avert the so-called fiscal cliff becoming more apparent that senate republicans want a deal and they would like one pretty quick. but while there may be a bi-p t bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxe
that year coming up just a week later, israel invaded egypt. and they did it with the secret support of two major u.s. allies. france and england. it was a fight over control of the suez canal. the american president at that time, in 1956, was, of course, dwight eisenhower. republican. he was running for re-election against the democratic candidate that year, adlai stevenson. talk about an october surprise. that year it was eight days before election day. both candidates are forced to deal with an unexpected and genuine giant foreign policy crisis. >> on sunday the israeli government ordered total mobilization. on monday, their armed forces penetrated deeply into egypt and to the vicinity of the suez canal, nearly 100 miles away. and on tuesday, the british and french governments delivered a 12-hour ultimatum to israel and egypt, now followed up by armed attack against egypt. the united states was not consulted in any way about any phase of these actions. nor were we informed of them in advance. >> president eisenhower sounding kind of mad, right? the u.s. had not been informed about the at
. >>> plus, the people of egypt trying to avoid trading one dictator for another. fighting back against a president who gave himself new powers. tonight a potential crisis point as the leader tries to put himself above the law. and how will the u.s. handle this? >>> plus, the chances of winning are ridiculously low. but millions of us are still lining up for a shot at a record powerball jackpot. >> lucky, lucky, lotto win. >> shepard: tonight a look at the actual odds of winning it all. but first from fox this tuesday night, three republican senators now say they cannot support the u.n. ambassador, susan rice, for secretary of state. at least until they get more answers about her comments about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. president obama has not yet even nominated her. but the white house says she is enormously qualified. senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly ayotte say they're even more troubled now after meeting with ambassador rice. the attack on libya on september 11 killed the u.s. ambassador, cries stevens and three other americans. five days later, amba
next, a lot of people in egypt are not happy with their country's president. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like ourender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart
. these were things that were going to be discussed. as long as the cease-fire held, egypt being the keeper of the cease-fire, and a senior israeli diplomat told me that they were very glad to see that egypt was filling that role again, mubarak's regime filled the role when he was in power, and they were worried that president morsi was not going to be able to do that because he's more aligned with hamas because he's aligned with the muslim brotherhood. so they're quite happy to see that at least egypt is sort of there, supposed to be the keeper of the peace for the time being. but it is worrying that we're seeing an incident so quickly after the cease-fire was put in place. and a lot of concerns that if this sort of thing starts happening again, there's always incidents along that israel/gaza border that the cease-fire will mean nothing in the next few days. >> sara sidner live for us in jerusalem. as always, thank you. >> i want to bring in stuart holliday the former u.s. ambassador for special political affairs to the united nations. he's currently the president and ceo of the meridian i
we should be thankful for when it comes to the political world. and egypt's muslim brotherhood. the cease-fire deal betweend evf israel and hamas. we have that coming up next. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> more breaking news and developing stories on a brand-new hour on "happening now." >> a new holiday spending bonanza. americans are feeling more confident about our economy. will lead to the great of growth, and what could set us back? >> also, an arrest in a string of murders in new york city connected to one gunman. what we are learning about the man that police in new york city say was poised to strike again. and a large bird crashes through the cockpit plane of this airport. details of the scare in the air for the pilot and passengers. it's all "happening now." >> but first, the cease-fire truce may be fragile, but it appeals to be holding. i am heather childers in for jenna lee. >> and i am rick scott in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed mo
-up like this. you have a u.s. tourist in place like tee egypt who might get kidnapped. as individuals and citizens traveling abroad we have to increase our security. of course the other thing we talk about when you talk about the middle east is the oil supplies. melissa: right. a third of the world's oil comes from this region. at the same time egypt's relationship with israel has gotten worse it seems. is that accurate? they're we're talking about the suez canal. we're not just talking about oil. we're talking about all kinds of trade. >> no, exactly, that is exactly the point. egypt is critical to this. there is a reason we spent decades in, you know, worked so hard, the u.s., to create the camp david accords back in the 1979 and that we spent billions of dollars each and every year giving money to israelis and egyp shuns to keep that in place. egypt is strategic culturally throughout the region and just physically. the suez canal is major, major arterry for trade. you also have a lot of pipelines and other ways that oil moves around in that region. if egypt decides to go ahead and
. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted their sources but also hearing seniors, including the arab league, suggests that leadership of various countries and organizations are coming to the region for an announcement which the vetting is that this evening hillary clinton will be meeting israeli prime minister and the betting is at that time the ceas
of peace looking at the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia and libya. the arab spring are in the state of transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each. this took place earlier this week in washington. it's two hours. >> good morning everyone. i'm steve heydemann for issues of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on the securities sector reform in the arab world and some rsvp to me have been scared by the false rumor that it would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that is not the case. so you do not need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you here with us all this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important but also especially urgent. i do not think that it is an exaggeration to say what happens with the security sectors in the arab world and by security sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus that
a place like egypt, we see that happen. as individuals and citizens traveling abroad, we ha individs traveling abroad, we have to increase our security. also, the oil supply. >> we are not just talking about oil, we are talking about other things as well. >> that is exactly the point. egypt is critical to this. there is a reason that we spent decades and worked so hard to create a campaign back in 1979. and then we spent billions of dollars each and every year giving money to the israelis and egyptians to keep them in place. because egypt is strategic culturally throughout the region and also physically. the suez canal is a major artery for trade and we also have a lot of pipelines and other ways that oil moves around in that region. if israel decides to do this, you will have a very different type of map in the middle east. melissa: thank you so much for joining us. sit down and talk a lot. after hearing nothing but chatter from lawmakers on how to deal with the fiscal cliff, money has taken matters into our own hands and we will go through these solutions and solve this problem, at
also in egypt, cairo, tear gas had to be used when critics accuse president mohammed morsi. and the muslim pre brotherhood of monopolizing power and one little to bring real reform. prominent democracy advocate warrants that clashes lead to the military stepping and he also calls the egypt's president " the new pharaoh " opposition groups and government supporters have called for competing rallies on tuesday. your forecast, next. >> we are seeing this live look. there are even fog advisory, please be extra careful. chun doo? >> good morning. this is from our mt. tam. >> janu -- >> we are respecting some afternoon sun shines. but that is expected to return as marty mentioned a dense fog advisory for the north bay. 4:09 a.m. and also the gulf. that will last longer around 10:00 a.m. and allow yourself extra time. it will mainly be along the bayshore. for this afternoon it will clear out with a sunny afternoon but not that long. 5:00 p.m., it will press and along the san mateo coast. and even overnight. for those of you headed out as to going to the airport? there are delays a
there are major developments to tell you about in egypt. new protests breaking out after egyptian president mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt.
, but wants this resolved by the two parties involved. some are looking to egypt to be a possible mediator wondering if egypt will be able to pressure hamas to back off as president hosni mubarak used to do. today the egyptian prime minister went into gaza trying to organize some kind of ceasefire. clearly it didn't work. inside israel three people died when a missile hit their home. talk about living in fear, this tel aviv couple forced to take wedding pictures outside a bomb shelter. in gaza city israel's airstrikes continue pounding away at militants themselves, weapons facilities and missile launching sites. for the first time both the israeli army and hamas have taken to twitter threatening one another. israelis are tweeting no hamas leader better show his face above ground. hamas is saying any more air attacks, we're going to hit more populated israeli targets. bottom line, the u.s. says israel has the right to self- defense. >>> meanwhile we're wrapping up a long bizarre week for former cia chief david petraeus. his sex scandal took a back seat today to the benghazi investigation. p
leaders in tunisia and in egypt. in tunisia, the foreign minister was here in gaza today. hamas is an offshoot of the muslim brotherhood. the egyptian president is now from the muslim brotherhood. the prime minister is from the muslim brotherhood. hamas is counting on this arab solidarity, this new playing field to significantly change the balance of power between the hamas militants, who clearly don't have the kind of weapons that israel has, but they think now that they will have broader political support, not from just the new arab governments, but also from the newly empowered arab street. >> how nervous is this making the united states, though? given the arab spring, given that tenuous support for pease by the muslim brotherhood, is israel being encouraged to show restraint in this case? >> reporter: i think the united states is asking all parties to show restraint. the president, according to reports, has spoken with mohamed morsi. he's spoken to the israelis. it's in israel's interest. it's in egypt's interest. it's in the united states' interest to tamp this down. it is
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